The Hangul Celluloid Korean reviews section contains reviews of new and existing DVD releases of South Korean films. Click any of the links below to read the relevant review or use the links above to browse the site.
REVIEWS (KOREAN FILMS)





90 Minutes:
With its pulse-pounding, sexually-charged story detailing female retribution against a self-serving male guilty of flagrant sexual indiscretions and abuses, '90 Minutes' not only stands as an utterly gripping thriller but also serves to further the ongoing trend for depictions of strong women in Korean cinema as a whole...




A Boy's Sister:
One moment moving and poignant, another brutal and difficult to watch, 'A Boy's Sister' is ultimately a gripping depiction of deep-seated pain, guilt and blame and though, to my mind, one theme in particular is rather unnecessarily overstated, the film overall deftly succeeds in its goals...




Actresses:
Described by director EJ Yong as "a combination of reality show and fake documentary", Actresses nonetheless contains more than one segment utterly real in feeling and ultimately it is almost undeniable that some truth lays within the fiction...
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Addicted:
Each of the characters becomes an unwilling victim of the love that they choose and each has to question whether to pay the high price which that love requires...




Addicted:
Director Ahn Gook-jin’s debut feature, ‘Alice in Earnestland’, has polarised audiences since its release – you’ll either love it or absolutely hate it – but those who can indulge themselves in Soo-nam’s surreally comic horror story will be rewarded with inventive set pieces bringing thoughts of numerous classic Korean films to mind...




Amor:
There was a time in Korean cinema when terminal illness was a regular and recurring theme. With its gentle depth and understated, yet wholly realistic, heart-wrenching  characterisations, ‘Amor’ resolutely reminds us of why the best of such films became thought of as classics at the same time maintaining an originality to its ultimately thought provoking narrative...




Antique Bakery:
Initially appearing to simply be a warm and genuinely funny comedy that gently details themes of sexuality and acceptance, Antique Bakery nonetheless quickly proves itself to be so much more; deftly accenting numerous genres along its ultimately cathartic path...




April Snow:
A melancholy tale of love and betrayal, April Snow may not be as instantly accessible as some of Hur Jin-ho's other films, but is a worthy addition to his CV, nonetheless...




Architecture 101:
While Architecture 101 covers territory similar to that seen in a plethora of incredibly well known Korean films it nonetheless manages to stand as a worthy addition to the romantic drama genre, rather than simply appearing as a derivation, as a result of the genuine beauty and believability of its gently affecting tale...




Arirang:
Arirang is a deeply personal search for catharsis from a director frozen by how he feels he's been treated by the film industry and, regardless of whether or not you are a fan of his work, it stands as an utterly unmissable example of his talent. To my mind, at its time of making Arirang was quite simply Kim Ki-duk's best film to date...




Assassination:
Even from its early stages, it's easy to see why 'Assassination' was such a huge draw at the Korean box office. Sumptuous visuals combine with a gripping narrative to provide out-and-out entertainment, albeit rather overlong and somewhat lacking in character depth...




An Atrocity:
Despite its short running time, 'An Atrocity' not only succeeds in easily standing alongside the majority of feature length Korean thrillers detailing feminine vengeance and revenge but also by means of its female directed perspective serves as a much needed antithesis to recent male-created (and some would say misogynistic) cinematic offerings, while being portrayed in an equally brutal fashion...




Awaiting:
A touching, affecting story of aging, separation and yearning within a life put on hold for love, Kang Je-gyu's short 'Awaiting' is, at just 26 minutes in duration, easily as worthy of attention, discussion and indeed acclaim as any feature-length drama you could name...




Azooma:
At its core, 'Azooma' is a critique of Korean society at large; a dissection of injustices in the name of procedure; and lingering patriarchy within an ever-changing male/female cultural balance. However, the decision to focus the narrative culmination on suddenly chosen revenge, almost as catharsis, leaves 'Azooma' rather teetering between being an overly rushed revenge genre film and an insightful dramatic thriller...




Bedevilled:
A slow burning film which racks up the tension incrementally, Bedevilled builds to unleash violent, bloody retribution within a tale which is ultimately powerful, poignant and deeply moving...




The Berlin File:
‘The Berlin File’ is at once a tale of political intrigue and a dissection of contrasting North and South Korean attitudes to humanity, morals and freedom all wrapped up in a high-octane, pulse-pounding thriller and while the ultimate narrative destination can largely be predicted without too much difficulty, in this case the journey there is equally as important, if not more so...




Bleak Night:
A multi-layered, multi-themed dissection of adolescence, Bleak Night delves into issues of peer pressure, bullying, guilt, blame and culpability within a brooding, yet gripping, tale of the intricacies and difficulties of relationships...




Blood and Ties:
While 'Blood and Ties' tries to be an original take on a familiar narrative subject in its attempted dissection of familial ties, any chance of insightful commentary is marred by plot holes and predictably throughout. Ultimately, the appearance and performances of Son Ye-jin and Kim Kap-soo are by far the strongest aspects of the film...




Bluebeard:
In her second feature, Bluebeard, director Lee Soo-yeon infuses elements of both horror and psychological thriller within a fast-paced serial killer tale. While Bluebeard may not necessarily be mentioned alongside the best of the best of the genre, it nonetheless largely succeeds where so many Korean serial killer films have failed, anal probes notwithstanding...




Blue Swallow:
An epic film in every sense, Blue Swallow bravely tells the controversial story of pioneering Korean female aviator, Park Kyung-won. How much of the film's narrative is historical fact, and how much is simply a cinematic flight of fancy, is certainly open for debate but, nonetheless, Blue Swallow boldly states that Park Kyung-won was a woman to be greatly admired, rather than vilified...




Breathless:
Breathless is a visceral discussion of the legacy which violence can create and the ease with which it can span generations, infecting everything and everyone in its path. An outstanding film which truly packs a punch, Breathless will take your breath away...




Broken:
While on a cursory glance ‘Broken’ would appear to be yet another example to be added to the utter plethora of Korean cinematic tales of revenge and retribution, take a closer look and you will find the detailing of one man's search for closure and a way to bring an end to heart-wrenching pain far more than any pursuit of vigilante justice down the barrel of a shotgun...




Canola:
Featuring powerhouse performances from actresses Yoon Yeo-jeong and Kim Go-eun, ‘Canola’ is an unashamed tearjerker that gives a heartfelt and poignant definition of what family truly is...




Cart:
While it would be difficult - some might say nigh on impossible - for any film on the subject of workers' rights and labour laws to come even close to the importance of 1995's 'A Single Spark', with 'Cart' (based on a true-life incident that occurred in 2007) Boo Ji-young nonetheless successfully combines an insightful story of workplace injustices with a tale of female empowerment that is both human and humane...




Castaway on the Moon:
Castaway on the Moon deftly combines social commentary with one of the warmest and gently funny narratives of recent memory to create what can only be described as a classic piece of Korean cinema, and let's face it, only inspired filmmaking could make you believe that there is hope to be found at the bottom of a packet of black bean noodles... but believe you will...




The Chaser:
If Old Boy and Memories of Murder had an illegitimate love child it would be The Chaser. That said, the plot still grippingly supplants expectations...




Chilling Romance:
A film that uses classic romantic comedy narrative ideas and combines them beautifully with humorous homages to, and parodies of, well know Asian horror movies, Chilling Romance may only be light-hearted entertainment at its core but entertaining it is, all the same...




Christmas in August:
One of Hur Jin-ho's most accessible films, Christmas in August is a heartfelt, poignant and affecting story of love and loss, in which the words "I love you" never need to be said...




The Classic:
When all is said and done, The Classic still manages to be better as a whole than as the sum of its component parts should allow but it really is a pity that a film as gorgeous as this is prevented by the contrivances and problems present from being as truly memorable as it could so easily have been...
Cold Eyes:
A remake/reworking of 2007 Hong Kong thriller 'Eye in the Sky', 'Cold Eyes' steps up scale, pace and warmth to stand on its own as a wholly engaging and thoroughly entertaining blockbuster that even largely manages to feel specifically Korean in nature, in spite of never straying too far from the original...
The Classic:
Superbly choreographed, perfectly realised action/fight sequences ultimately cannot hide A Company Man's narrative predictability and though director Lim Sang-yoon should indeed for credited for attempting a critique of company hierarchy, work ethics and expected loyalty, this dissection feels somewhat underwhelming by comparison...
The Concubine:
A sumptuous and erotically-charged period drama, both visually and in terms of narrative content, 'The Concubine' is every bit as gripping as it is intricate; as involving as it is involved...
Confession of Murder:
Brutal at times, humorous at others, Confession of Murder is a thoroughly engaging serial killer tale though it could be said that both its narrative and execution borrow ever so slightly too much from a number of classic, and famously noteworthy, Korean thrillers...
Crazy First Love:
In other hands, Crazy First Love could, perhaps, have been an engaging romantic comedy with some poignant moments but, sadly, what we end up with here is simply a collection of borrowed ideas from other superior movies, nailed together by annoying characters and illogical character motivations...
Crocodile:
Kim Ki-duk’s debut feature ‘Crocodile’ is a study of violence in South Korean society and is frankly unlike any other Korean films made before it...
The Crucible:
Based on the true story of innocent children physically and sexually abused at a school for the deaf, The Crucible is a brutal, visceral and ultimately heartbreaking tale serving as proof (if proof were needed) that real life can be far more cruel than fiction...




Daisy:
Daisy would be an stunningly beautiful, engaging love story and suspenseful thriller if not for the lapses in logic and the fact that the narration pushes itself too far and takes itself a little bit too seriously...






Daytime Drinking:
Daytime Drinking is such a gently paced, deeply eccentric and genuinely funny road movie that once you've had even a tiny taste of it, you'll want to drink it to the very last drop...




Dear Dictator:
Even for those familiar with director Lee Sang-woo's earlier work, 'Dear Dictator' is bleak to a level that is never an easy watch. However, this is a deeply thought provoking narrative that needs to be told; being a highly original take on the spy/espionage genre, in the process...




Death Bell:
While Death Bell is unlikely to cause viewers to alter their list of the best ever South Korean horror films, its old-school feel combined with elements from more recent visceral horror fare, alongside numerous references to the incredible pressures that Korea’s school system can place on pupils, parents and teachers alike, ensure that it is nonetheless a welcome addition to the horror genre...




Desire to Kill:
Desire to Kill references some fairly serious social themes within a quirky and genuinely funny black comedy come psychological thriller, accenting and underlining each with copious amounts of bloody violence throughout. Just don't, whatever you do, be as lazy as to compare it to Oldboy...




Diary of June:
Though certainly not a perfect film (if such a thing exists), Diary of June still has much more to offer than standard serial killer fare, detailing, within its story, a fairly taut critique of the school system, bullying and the pressures placed on children by parents, and vice versa...




Dirty Romance:
While certainly hard-hitting and wholly in keeping with director Lee Sang-woo's previous work, 'Dirty Romance' has moments of warmth, of understated humour and even of beauty to add layers and further levels to this already accomplished, thought provoking and important independent film...




Doctor:
With 'Missing' having appeared to point to Kim Seong-hong as a director with a talent for realising visceral narratives in almost shocking but nonetheless gripping form, I for one was hopeful that 'Doctor' would further build his reputation within the horror genre. Sadly, though 'Doctor' is indeed notable it is so for largely the wrong reasons...




Does Cuckoo Cry at Night:
Does Cuckoo Cry at Night tells the story of the simple, traditional life of a charcoal maker and his innocent wife, subplot elements and characters threatening their idyllic existence standing as metaphors to the modernisation of Korea itself...




Double Agent:
Though flawed, Double Agent resolutely shows that it doesn't need CGI pyrotechnics or secret agent gadgets to be an engaging spy thriller throughout...




Eungyo:
Eungyo is, on the surface, the story of a controversial relationship between a 70-year-old man and a high school girl, but ultimately provides a moving dissection of age and loneliness that deserves to be described as more than simply an 'erotic thriller', though both thrilling and erotic it is...




The Face Reader:
While The Face Reader could be said to have a somewhat simpler story overall than many of its Joseon era set contemporaries, its narrative is nonetheless as nuanced, multilayered and gripping as any; the sidestepping of any sexual/adult content serving to show that graphic sexual imagery is not a prerequisite for insightful drama...




Failan:
In every aspect Failan is a ground breaking film, imaginatively conceived and expertly executed. Hollywood could never succeed in making a film which breaks your heart the way Failan does and let's hope it never tries...




The Fox Family:
At the same time, a horror film, a black comedy, a musical extravaganza and a love story, The Fox Family asks whether humanity is reserved for, and often wasted on, humans. A genuinely funny and engaging film which, like its characters, has more to it than initially meets the eye...
The Fox with Nine Tails:
With the age-old Korean folklore of a fox spirit attempting to become human at its core, The Fox with Nine Tails merges fantasy, horror, romance and melodrama to create a tale with a moral worthy of the legend on which it’s based...
The Front Line:
While it could be said that the characterisations in The Front Line would have benefitted from having more depth and being slightly less obvious, the film nonetheless remains a far more worthy cinematic offering than any war film about a horse, Oscar nomination or not...
Ghost Theatre:
Regardless of your particular preference within Korean Cinema, there are times when we all just want to be warmly entertained, and if that's what your hankering for, Ghost Theatre really is something to make a song and dance about...
Go, Stop, Murder:
'Go, Stop, Murder' gives a highly original take on classic Korean Cinema ideas and themes; feeling refreshingly different while retaining an almost unconscious familiarity. An unashamedly low budget production that deftly uses its financial limitations to greatly strengthen an already intelligently written script...




The Good, The Bad, The Weird:
Ok, the plot isn't multi-layered, there's no real "good will triumph over evil" but if that's what you're looking for you're missing the point...






A Good Lawyer's Wife:
On the surface, A Good Lawyer's Wife positively pulsates with explicitness while, at its heart, beats a deeply intelligent critique of family and the scars that familial bonds can create...




Green Chair:
Tackling the taboo subject of a love affair frowned upon by society, Green Chair exquisitely, and explicitly, gives an insight into the minds, and opinions, of those both inside and outside the risqué relationship...




Han Gong-ju:
While centred on the victimisation and abuse of a schoolgirl and featuring a number of elements often seen in school-based narratives, 'Han Gong-ju' has far more in common with insightful dramas dissecting societal attitudes, persecutions, misperceptions and assumptions. Exemplary in realisation, there is a great deal more to 'Han Gong-ju' than its school-centric setting might infer...




The Handmaiden:
Park Chan-wook’s ‘The Handmaiden’ is a masterful film contrasting dark with light and (male) lecherous ugliness with (female) emotional beauty in a multilayered tale of immaculate depth and indeed meaning. Ultimately, ‘The Handmaiden’ sits atop the very best of Korean cinema, both in terms of narrative content and visual sumptuousness...

Hansel and Gretel



Hansel & Gretel:
Yim Phil-sung has produced a stunningly beautiful dark fantasy which rewrites, or more exactly, extends the Grimm fairy tale we all know...





Happy End:
Happy End is an uncompromising look at the human heart and how its desires, if unchecked, can rule the head with cataclysmic results. A cautionary tale which is both explicit and unmissable...





The Harmonium In My Memory:
At the same time sad, funny, moving and uplifting, The Harmonium In My Memory is what everyone's first love should be...




Harmony:
Attempting to be a poignant melodrama containing both humorous and uplifting elements, Harmony largely fails due to the disparity of its constituent parts - each detracting from the others' effectiveness, with none truly mixing harmoniously...




Helpless:
A deftly layered mystery thriller with depth, Helpless initially appears as the story of one man's desperate search for his missing fiancé, gradually morphing to detail the myriad of lies his wife-to-be has told, with the "why" being every bit as important as the wherefore...




Hope (aka Wish):
On the surface, the storyline of 'Hope' - detailing the aftermath of a young child's abduction, abuse and rape - bears a striking resemblance to a number of recent Korean box office thrillers, but delve just a little deeper and Lee Joon-ik’s sublime film quickly shows itself to be far more layered, nuanced and heartfelt than most. Ultimately, it is the astounding performance of child actress Lee Re as the titular character that will repeatedly break the heart, guaranteed...




The Housemaid (1960):
A claustrophobic, yet gripping, morality tale, The Housemaid is as vital today as it was on its release fifty years ago. No wonder that both Bong Joon-ho and Park Chan-wook have cited it as a major influence on their work...




The Housemaid (2010):
Though not as subtly stated, socially accurate, or downright claustrophobic and creepy as its illustrious predecessor, The Housemaid still stands its ground as a well realised and gripping thriller which deftly shows that power can easily become as addictive as a drug...




The Humanist:
Though somewhat flawed and erratically paced, The Humanist still has a lot to offer fans of wilfully tasteless, yet genuinely funny, humour.
Just don't let your local nun watch it...




I am Trash:
'I am Trash' is as hard-hitting and shocking as almost any Korean film in recent memory but it's importance cannot be overstated  and while its character outcome could never be condoned in reality, its ultimate statement loudly screams of severe punishment sorely being needed in society for extreme sexual crimes...




Il Mare:
Il Mare is unashamedly romantic through and through but never resorts to being sappy. Warmth exudes from the characters, the dialogue and the screen imagery and the whole films feels like it could be real - quite something considering the other-worldliness of the story...




I'm A Cyborg:
If you were to cross One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest with Amelie and add a healthy dose of Terminator you would come pretty close to getting I'm A Cyborg...




In Between Days:
A meditative and thought-provoking film which charts the inner turmoil of a girl struggling to come to terms with a new life and changing feelings, In Between Days is beautifully filmed, superbly acted and expertly realised...





Innocent Thing:
While somewhat marred by a deliberate, and noticeable, withholding of information, 'Innocent Thing' still manages to stand as an engaging drama/thriller; a story of love, obsession and revenge the conclusion of which greatly strengthens the entire preceding narrative...




Invasion of Alien Bikini:
Starting out as a genuinely funny and stylishly brutal sci-fi B-movie, Invasion of Alien Bikini is sadly marred by one rather misogynistic, mean-spirited scene and, to my mind, never fully manages to recover its early promise...




I Saw The Devil:
A visceral, brutal, yet at times beautiful, film, I Saw The Devil deftly shows that no closure, appeasement or fulfillment is to be found in the act of revenge, with only emptiness and the unforeseen consequences of vengeful actions ultimately resulting from it...




Jiseul:
Based on the true-life US military-ordered 'eviction' of communists from Jeju Island in 1948, 'Jiseul' is as bleak as it is striking, as intricate as it is poignant; a deft cinematic piece truly worthy of the accolades it has received throughout the world...




The Journals of Musan:
The Journals of Musan is without question an incredibly dark affair, but it never fails to touch the heart and ultimately stands as a fitting tribute to a gentle man who was never given the chance he truly deserved...




July 32nd:
There is no happiness whatsoever in July 32nd, and a bleaker film would be quite an effort to find, but a story this poignantly satisfying and deftly executed cannot fail to grip like a vice, breaking the heart and remaining in the mind long after the credits roll. Astounding...




Juvenile Offender:
On one level, 'Juvenile Offender' sits perfectly between ever popular Korean cinema depictions of disaffected youth and critiques focused on those who for one reason or another find themselves on the very edge of ‘normal’ society; on another, it stands as an almost archetypal romantic melodrama narrative. As such, ‘Juvenile Offender’ is ultimately as warm, caring, affectionate and affecting as it is gritty, hard-hitting and socially aware...





Kill Me:
While the concept of a hardened hitman gradually falling in love with his intended target is certainly nothing new, director Yang Jong-hyeon brings a freshness to the idea by turning it completely (and literally) on its head, allowing the film to successfully step away from predictability to become something much more original and memorable...




Killer Toon:
'Killer Toon' starts out incredibly strongly - an interesting premise deftly realised with the help of exquisitely dark, stunning webtoon visuals - and though the film somewhat loses its way in the middle section of proceedings, ultimately it stands as an engaging addition to the Korean horror film genre; complete with several perfectly creepy moments along the way...




King of Pigs:
While the ideas of 'violence begets violence' and 'fight fire with fire' are indeed inherent to the King of Pigs narrative, they really are just the tip of the iceberg within this dark, brooding and brutal dissection of humanity itself...




The Last Princess:
The Last Princess is as visually sumptuous as it is epic, with an understated emotional depth underlined by an incredible performance from actress Son Ye-jin which can be almost guaranteed to bring tears to the eyes and a lump to the throat. Ultimately, this story of the last princess of the Joseon Dynasty is one that truly needed to be told...




Leafie: A Hen into the Wild:
Disney once asked viewers to believe that an elephant can fly. With Leafie: A Hen into the Wild, you'll believe that a hen has a heart, and a beautiful one at that...




Let's Dance:
'Let's Dance' combines historical information; footage from legal proceedings; real life first-person interviews; and acted - 'created' - content to provide an insightful documentary on the ongoing debate relating to the legality of, and attitudes to, abortion in South Korea. However, vital though the film's overall statement is, it is the poignant and often traumatic individual stories of the female interviewees that will stay with viewers long after the credits roll...




Lies:
Despite the use of numerous contrived plot devices throughout, Lovers' Concerto is, nonetheless, an extremely engaging, deeply moving tale of heartbreak, love and loss...




Lovable:
An utterly exquisite, poignant and ultimately uplifting film telling the tale of a little girl’s love for a snowman, Lovable deftly strips away the veil of illness to show how intelligent, creative and inspiring autistic children truly can be...




Lovers' Concerto:
Despite the use of numerous contrived plot devices throughout, Lovers' Concerto is, nonetheless, an extremely engaging, deeply moving tale of heartbreak, love and loss...




Man of Vendetta:
While “race against time” thrillers are two-a-penny in almost any culture, not least South Korean cinema, Man of Vendetta nonetheless manages to supplant expectations on several occasions and, thankfully, steers clear of any forced upbeat moments and saccharine segments to allow for some genuine unpredictability and gravitas to be displayed...




A Man Who Was Superman:
A Man Who Was Superman is a moving character study showing the frailties of the human mind and the resultant effects of both physical and emotional trauma. A film which ultimately reminds us that though the past can't be changed the future has not yet been written...




Melo:
While 'Melo' is on the surface a dark tale of love, sex and trust (or the lack thereof), it also serves as a dissection of selfishness and self-perception; ultimately detailing the twisted path down which personal need placed above all else can lead...




Memoir of a Murderer:
Director Won Shin-yeon takes Kim Young-ha's story of an ex-serial killer suffering from dementia and successfully elicits both viewer sympathy for the character in his fight to retain his memories and indeed himself and empathy, to as much a degree as possible, for him in his battle against an even greater monster...




Memories of Murder:
Based on the true story of South Korea's first serial-killer case, Memories of Murder is a masterpiece which seemlessly blends drama, tension and even black humour...





Metamorphoses:
Initially appearing as a gently humorous story of one man's unrequited love for a beautiful woman, Metamorphoses mirrors its theme of "nothing is as it first appears", to ultimately become a brutal, menacing, bloody, and extremely funny, "careful what you wish for" cautionary tale...




The Mimic:
The Mimic is at times genuinely scary, at others deeply creepy, but it is the phenomenal performances of veteran actress Yum Jung-ah and eight-year-old newcomer Shin Rin-ah – and indeed the sheer, palpable chemistry within their interactions – that will ultimately stay with viewers long after the credits roll...




Miss Granny:
'While 'Miss Granny' is wholly light-hearted (and indeed light) entertainment at its core, it nonetheless contains aspects utterly inherent to classic Korean comedies over the years and elements that speak of a number of hugely influential films; all adding up to an intelligently written, genuinely funny film that stands as an example of quality Korean comedy at its very best...




Miss Longlegs:
'Miss Longlegs’ is, at its core, a simple story but one which is also deceptively so and, like the characters themselves, its underlying depth is far, far greater than that assumed from a cursory glance. Ultimately, what ‘Miss Longlegs’ deftly states will stay with you almost infinitely longer than its 21-minute running time...




Miss the Train:
With its gently understated narrative realisation, 'Miss the Train' is at once a spiritual tale of destiny and a dream-like journey through love and loss, in classic Korean Cinema style, and though many will be able to anticipate the endpoint of the main character's story arc with little trouble, in a film such as this the beauty and engagement of the journey itself takes precedence over any revelation at its destination...




Missing:
Though largely predictable and unevenly paced, Missing still manages to be unsettling and even moving at times, and while it may not be the best example of its genre, it stands its ground fairly well, all the same...




Missing (aka Missing Woman):
While the societal issues critiqued in 'Missing' - and indeed its child abduction story as a whole - can be found in a virtual plethora of Korean films, director Lee Eon-hee wholly succeeds in weaving them together into a worthy, grippingly intricate and ultimately deeply poignant tale of motherhood and female understanding of female pain...




Missing You:
While many of the narrative elements of ‘Missing You’ will be very familiar to fans of Korean cinema, its story of one young woman’s need for revenge is engaging enough to make the film worth watching, its strongest point being its ultimate conclusion...




MJ:
Beautifully understated in its narrative realisation, 'MJ' takes a seemingly inconsequential, almost passing moment and deftly details the part it plays in changing the entire life of a young woman for the better. Though just 22 minutes in duration, MJ’s warmth and uplifting nature becomes ever more noticeable (and indeed welcome) as the story unfolds...




Moebius:
Originally given a Restricted rating by the Korean Media Ratings Board, Kim Ki-duk's twisted tale of sex, religion, castration and incest subsequently underwent a number of cuts to gain a mainstream domestic cinema release. 'Moebius' is no less shocking as a result of those cuts...




A Moment:
'A Moment' is easily as topical today as it was when it was made in 2010, and considering recent news stories from China, perhaps even more so. A dark and twisted tale which resolutely shows that an action taken in a single moment can ultimately change the lives of all concerned, irrevocably...




A Moment to Remember:
While the plot of A Moment To Remember is contrived and manipulative, it still, somehow, manages to be affecting - with Son Ye-jin's astounding performance selling every line - and as the credits roll, you'll find yourself thinking that you should have (and did) know better, but a part of you will secretly be glad you didn't listen...




Moss:
Based on an internet comic of the same name, Moss’ underlying references to power; corruption; revenge and guilt, as well as sin and redemption, create a veritable labyrinth of elements within the narrative, ultimately allowing the film to be far more worthy than one might initially imagine...




Mother:
In, perhaps, his most accomplished film to date, Bong Joon-ho successfully shows us how fine the line, between being a mother and becoming a monster, really can be...
Mother is a Whore:
With its intelligently written and deftly executed narrative, Mother is a Whore serves not only as a searing, bleak and unsettling tale but also as an in-depth critique of the concept of family...
Mourning Grave:
With 'Mourning Grave', director Oh In-chun uses his experience of blending horror and humour - as seen in his 2012 short 'Metamorphoses' - extending it to also include romance and melodrama; thereby not only fulfilling the almost requisite Korean cinema merging of love, loss and laughter elements in a single narrative but also resulting in the film feeling utterly classic, from the first frame to the last...



Mulberry:
A simple story concept that uses understated humour to draw audiences into a sumptuously erotic tale that not so long before would have been virtually taboo, ‘Mulberry’ also gives Korean cinema fans the opportunity to watch Lee Mi-sook as a young actress and realise that she was every bit as talented all those years ago as she has shown herself to be through her lengthy career to veteran status...



My Dear Enemy:
Initially appearing to be a quirky "road movie", My Dear Enemy ultimately proves itself to be an uplifting and multi-layered character study. An engaging and gently gripping film from beginning to end...
My Dear Girl, Jin-young:
My Dear Girl, Jin-young deftly stands as one of the latest cinematic examples to show just how far the Korean Romantic Comedy genre has come over the years in its depictions of relationships, social issues and sexuality; the film's intelligently realised themes beautifully wrapped up in a warm and genuinely funny, zombie filled tale...
My Heart:
Director Bae Chang-ho and actress Kim Yoo-mee's co-written narrative is sometimes gently funny, often heartbreaking and ultimately wholly uplifting. A story told with and showing so much genuine heart that My Heart is the only adequately fitting title...



My Mother The Mermaid:
My Mother The Mermaid is a simple story, beautifully conceived, realised and acted throughout. Dedicated "To mother", it, in fact, stands as a dedication to motherhood itself...
My P.S Partner:
My P.S. Partner is as warmly romantic as any love story of recent years, as genuinely funny as almost any comedy you care to mention, and as sexy (and naughty) as any real-life relationship should be; all the while managing to be bravely frank to the point of groundbreaking in concept and narrative at the same time as feeling comfortably genre-familiar. In short, My P.S. Partner is the romantic comedy of 2012, period...




My Sassy Girl:
With engaging characters, witty dialogue and some truly laugh out loud moments My Sassy Girl makes watching a sociopath beat up her boyfriend more fun than you could ever imagine...




My Wife Got Married:
On the surface, a discussion of monogamy vs. polygamy, My Wife Got Married also serves as a critique, and subversion, of stereotypical male/female roles in relationships, all wrapped up within a gently humourous (albeit, erratically paced) romantic tale...




Natali:
If you're in need of a film with an engaging, heartfelt storyline, then watch an insightful drama; if you're looking for a sex film, watch a sex film. Despite its marketing, Natali fits into neither of these categories, and the most positive thing that can be said is that it's in 3D...




Neighbors:
While Korean cinema is well known for its ability to deftly merge genres, in ‘Neighbors’ their mixing with a multitude of individual character stories results in a film that, though interesting, feels rather cluttered and even schizophrenic on more than one occasion...




Night Fishing:
Take the fact that Night Fishing was made using the iPhone4 and completely set it aside, for even if you took all the best elements from Park Chan-wook's previous films, wrapped them up within a gripping narrative and added the beyond exemplary cast performances seen here, you still wouldn't come even close to creating a film as astounding as this, regardless of what technology was used...




Nora Noh:
Not only is 'Nora Noh' an insightful documentary telling of the iconic designer's efforts to create an exhibition to celebrate her 60 years in the fashion industry, but it also equally stands as a history of post-war Korea; an overview of the changing place of women in Korean society, over the years; and a detailing of the influence one woman's fashion designs had on both the Korean film industry of the 50s & 60s and its stars...




Norigae:
In the wake of true-life tales of the sexual coercion and abuse of celebrity figures in Korea, 'Norigae’ was always virtually guaranteed to be both controversial and shocking. A film that not only tells a story that desperately needed to be told but one that also points an accusing finger at the free reign often afforded to the powerful at the expense of the vulnerable. Ultimately, 'Norigae' both needs to be seen and, even more, discussed...




Oasis:
Lee Chang-dong has created a masterpiece in Oasis. It is both a love story and a story about the human condition and the mirror it holds up for viewers to look at themselves in stays long after the credits role...




Obsessed:
'Obsessed' for the most part succeeds in being a sensual, brooding and beautifully slow-burning tale of forbidden, illicit love but while director Kim Dae-woo's expertise in depicting palpably erotically-charged narratives serves as one of the film's many strong points his decision to ultimately pile 'final' melodramatic moment on top of final melodramatic moment is easily its weakest...




Okja:
Accomplished, quirky, eccentric and wholly memorable, Okja is not only a David & Goliath tale for the 21st century but also a hugely entertaining and insightful story of the ordinary pushed to extraordinary lengths by corporate lunacy, albeit with a couple of minor caveats...




One Day:
With One Day, director Lee Yoon-ki uses his almost trademark ability of showing characters’ innermost thoughts and emotions within outwardly simple stories to create an intelligent, nuanced and genuinely affecting tearjerker that deftly discusses abandonment, both perceived and actual...




Open City:
Though visually accomplished, Open City is sadly hampered by a predictable, unimaginative plot and a set of characters that are little more than caricatures...




Operation Chromite:
A film is only as strong as its weakest link, and in the case of Battle for Incheon: Operation Chromite the weakest link by far is Liam Neeson’s cringe-worthy dialogue, and indeed tortured performance, as General Douglas MacArthur...




Paju:
A melancholy, yet darkly beautiful, film, Paju asks whether ignorance really is bliss, or if it simply brings a different set of heartaches to those brought by knowledge. A film which not only needs to be seen, but deserves to be seen more than once...




The Peach Tree:
Any Korean film detailing themes of acceptance within a narrative centred on disability almost cannot fail to bring with it mention of and/or contrasts to Lee Chang-dong's masterful 'Oasis' but while such comparative dissections could be considered unfair they are to my mind validated by the fact that 'The Peach Tree' largely manages to hold its own fairly well in the face of such illustrious company; albeit with one or two minor caveats...




Peppermint Candy:
A compelling film which shows how innocence, hopes and dreams can so easily be lost before the heart even realises what is happening...




Perfect Number:
Based on the best-selling novel 'The Devotion of Suspect X' by Keigo Higashino, 'Perfect Number' centres its story on what one man is prepared to do for love. An in-depth yet nuanced thriller at its core and a romance in part, 'Perfect Number' ultimately answers the question of whether heart or mind will win in a battle between the two.




Petty Romance:
Live action and graphic novel imagery combine within this genuinely funny and warmly romantic tale to ensure that Petty Romance both touches the heart and tickles the funny bone throughout, though not necessarily in that order...




Pieta:
With Pieta, Kim Ki-duk has created a searing dramatic thriller set on the very cusp of society adding in copious social commentary, in the process. A film that is both worthy of his talent and utterly deserving of the numerous accolades it has received...




The Pirates:
W'hile The Pirates' is certainly a big budget, enjoyable romp there are numerous elements that are less accomplished than others and ultimately the lingering thought is just how easily the film could have been so much better...




Planet of Snail:
A deeply touching and poignant documentary presenting a window into the life, and world, of a gentle man who has become deaf-blind, Planet of Snail is ultimately far more a story of the strength of the human heart than of the weakness of the human body...




Pluto:
While several of Pluto's storyline elements, its setting and the appearance of actor Jo Seong-ha will likely combine to bring Yoon Sung-hyun's Bleak Night (2010) to viewers' minds, Shin Su-won's low budget thriller nonetheless manages to stand on its own as a dissection of fear within a dark and twisted tale laced with social commentary; ultimately feeling far more a companion piece than a derivation...




Poetry:
Poetry is the story of one woman's search for meaning, beauty and expression in a life peppered with pain and long lost dreams, and by the time the credits roll, viewers will be in no doubt that they have witnessed an utterly unforgettable, gentle yet gripping and poetic story which is equally as uplifting as it is poignant. In short, life is Poetry...




Portrait of a Beauty:
Sexually explicit in both narrative content and imagery, Portrait of a Beauty asks what dictates whether visual depictions of the sexual act are deemed as art or seen simply as pornography, deftly critiquing Joseon-era Korea, in the process...




The Priests:
While many would consider one exorcism horror movie to be much like another, ‘The Priests’ manages to combine ideas of modern Catholicism with far more traditional Buddhist rituals to bring a noticeable originality to proceedings. An engaging horror drama with utterly exemplary cast performances...




The Railroad:
A heartbroken train journey in the present juxtaposed with a poignant life journey in the past, The Railroad is a beautifully nuanced and understated tale that, ultimately, speaks of hope...




A Reason to Live:
While A Reason to Live should be commended for its attempt to dissect so many serious social, and even philosophical, issues within its narrative, its overuse of rather predictable clichés, contrived plot catalysts and its somewhat laboured pace detract from what would otherwise have been a worthy, cerebral story...




Re-encounter:
A dark and beautifully bleak affair, Re-encounter is a dissection of grief, guilt and regret that ultimately asks if it really is darkest before the dawn...




Remember O Goddess:
Every now and then, a film comes along that from the very outset resolutely, and effortlessly, reminds you of the reasons you fell in love with Korean Cinema in the first place. Remember O Goddess is one such film...




Remember You:
A genuinely poignant tale of forgotten love and remembered pain, 'Remember You' is at once beautifully romantic and utterly heartbreaking, ultimately asking if ignorance, perhaps, truly is bliss...




Revivre:
Im Kwon-taek's 'Revivre' is a powerful story of a man, whose wife is terminally ill, who begins to fantasise about a sexual relationship with a much younger woman. Deftly contrasting traditionalism and modernity within the characters themselves, Revivre's strengths ultimately lie in the painful, poignant realism on show, in spite of one rather questionable character motivation...




The Road:
Initially appearing to be a trip on foot to a specific geographical destination, The Road quickly shows itself to be far more a journey of the heart, mind and soul in search of an inner place of peace...




Sad Movie:
Initially succeeding as an engaging romantic drama with genuinely funny comedic elements, Sad Movie ultimately pushes too many heartbreaks too far...




Sa-kwa:
A constantly twisting plot detailing the intricacies of human deceit, betrayal, anger and regret, Sa-kwa is an astounding film, and there's no deception whatsoever in that statement...
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Save The Green Planet!:
Save The Green Planet is utterly bonkers. It's incredibly funny, viciously brutal, genuinely moving and completely nuts...




Scarlet Innocence:
While this present day reinterpretation of classic Korean folktale 'Simcheongga' (심청가) differs significantly from the original story, the intricately twisted, deeply involved and indeed noticeably emotional nature of Yim Pil-sung's sexually charged thriller 'Scarlet Innocence' (마담 뺑덕) positively screams of its pansori origin, throughout. A cautionary tale perfectly wrapped within a story of revenge and retribution, 'Scarlet Innocence' is ultimately as unpredictable as it is gripping...




The Scarlet Letter:
The Scarlet Letter is an utterly gripping work showing the darker side of love and the consequences of surrendering completely to lust and temptation. It also serves as a tribute to the talent of the late Lee Eun-joo...




The Scarlet Letter:
Scars is a dark, in-depth, nuanced dissection of the wounds that make us who we are and the resultant scars that prevent us from becoming the people we want to be. A film that not only grippingly details one woman's journey of self-discovery but also almost guarantees to leave viewers with thoughts of the scars that have affected their own lives...




Searching for the Elephant:
A strong narrative storyline is sadly marred by overly stylised visuals and direction that largely feel forced and predictable. While certainly not a total waste, Searching for the Elephant is ultimately far less than the gripping, explicit thriller it so easily could, and should, have been...




Secret Love:
Elements of thriller and suspense drama, sadly, cannot save Secret Love from essentially being a melodrama with little heart, and an all too familiar, overly contrived, and clumsily executed, plot simply begs the question of whether Secret Love should, perhaps, have remained secret, after all...




Secret Sunshine:
Secret Sunshine is both a study of grief and a dissection of faith and religion. Like director Lee Chang-dong's previous work the film doesn't shy away from showing the disintegration of a human being as a result of uncontrollable events and the actions those events illicit...





The Servant:
Billed as an "erotic rom-com", The Servant serves its purpose as a sensual and funny romance relatively well, but character depth and audience empathy suffer as the myriad of layers begin to build, and even the sumptuous visuals cannot rescue The Servant from ultimately failing to live up to its early promise...




Shadows in the Palace:
As layered as it is intricate, as bleak as it is visceral, Shadows in the Palace is a beautifully complex and intelligent period thriller; a twisted story of secrets, lies, power and hidden sexuality made all the stronger by the avoidance of sexually explicit visual imagery and titillation...




The Silenced:
Initially accomplished and deftly realised, The Silenced sadly soon becomes a victim of its own early promise. While the mystery at the film's core has worked well enough as a theme in 'B' action movies and sci-fi TV shows, the praiseworthy aspects of The Silenced ultimately deserve a far more original and unpredictable outcome...




Snowpiercer:
Based on the French graphic novel 'Le Transperceneige', 'Snowpiercer' can equally be viewed as an analogy to and critique of real world oppression; a hero's journey in classic Monomyth style; or simply a gripping and exciting rollercoaster ride of entertainment. Whether you choose just one or a combination of the above for your focus, one thing is guaranteed: 'Snowpiercer' will leave you both exhilarated and breathless...




Sopyonje:
A masterpiece of Korean Cinema, Sopyonje details the trials and tribulations of both the film’s characters and historical Korea itself, with the words mournful and hypnotic serving to describe both Sopyonje, the pansori music, and Sopyonje, the film...




Sorum:
With its slow, brooding and genuinely unsettling narrative, Sorum isn't a film which everyone will savour, but its uncompromisingly bleak depiction of the vicious depths to which human beings are capable of sinking certainly allows it to stand out from standard horror movie fare...




Speed:
While Speed is equally as hard-hitting and Korean specific as director Lee Sang-woo's earlier work, its story of the difficulties faced in life during the move from youth to adulthood makes it perhaps his most universally accessible film so far...




Spider Forest:
A combination of thriller, horror story and ghostly tale, Spider Forest details one man's attempts to uncover his forgotten memories, and serves as a thought provoking study of loss, betrayal, regret and self-destruction...




Spirits' Homecoming:
Spirits' Homecoming is an ultimately uplifting story that speaks of the closure and peace so desperately needed by blameless comfort women, which have sadly been so hard to find in reality...




Sprout:
The warmth, depth and meaning with which Yoon Ga-eun so successfully infuses this gentle, sweet and simple tale not only clearly shows her sheer talent as a director and storyteller but also deftly underlines how beautiful Korean cinema truly can be...




Summer Time:
Summer Time dissects and discusses the events surrounding, and subsequent to, the Kwangju uprising of 1980 within a deeply erotic and highly sexually charged narrative, and its ultimate success is largely dependent on whether or not individual viewers get overly bogged down (or caught up) by the sheer volume of sex and eroticism on show...




Sunny:
In Sunny, director Kang Hyeong-cheol takes what could easily have been a clichéd and predictable storyline and brings a freshness and vitality to proceedings at every single turn. While it could never be considered deep, Sunny, frankly, never tries to be, and instead successfully concentrates its efforts on mixing genuinely funny humour with truly moving drama, within an altogether incredibly engaging tale...




Sweet Dream:
Sweet Dream uses its dark tale of a woman choosing her own needs over her familial responsibilities to critique the modernisation of Korean society in the 30s. Pulling no punches, Sweet Dream serves up a classic Korean cinema narrative arc complete with what would later become almost requisite melodramatic elements...




A Tale of Two Sisters:
A lot of horror films are described in dark, brooding terms but very few could be described as beautiful. A Tale of Two Sisters is a sumptuously beautiful film...




The Taste of Money:
Ultimately, while The Taste of Money's narrative is without question an interesting concept in its extension of a previously dissected subject, by the very nature of the characters portrayed it was always going to risk falling flat emotionally. And fall flat The Taste of Money does...




Teenage Hooker Became A Killing Machine:
Teenage Hooker Became A Killing Machine sadly squanders the opportunity presented by one of the most evocative titles in recent memory; stretching a ten minute music video plot out to a laboured sixty minutes...



Thirst:
Thirst truly is a sumptuous film and the sum of its many parts utterly redefines the concept of beauty and the beast...
This Charming Girl:
This Charming Girl peels away the layers of an ordinary, everyday woman to reveal a character much more interesting and complex than she appears on the surface. An incredible film with astounding realism, This Charming Girl deftly shows that everyone has a story worth telling...




Thousand Years Old Fox:
Ultimately as important as it is enjoyable, Thousand Years Old Fox takes a 'classic horror' tack in its depiction of a disembodied gumiho spirit taking possession of a human body to exact revenge; standing almost as a bridge between standard Asian ghost/evil spirit horror tales and the gumiho horror-romances that would eventually follow...




Thread of Lies:
In focusing on the psychological aspects of bullying rather than the far more often seen examples of physical brutality, ‘Thread of Lies’ can delve far more deeply into the issue. An incredibly insightful and deeply poignant discussion of childhood persecution that feels utterly true to life, from start to finish...
Time:
More a discussion of perception than a depiction of the increasing trend for plastic surgery, Time ably shows that a physical change in appearance only scratches the surface, literally, of who a person is and the mental issues they have...
The Tower:
The Tower is a visually breathtaking high-spectacle disaster movie that, in spite of predictability, ultimately succeeds in being more entertaining and exciting than many films of its genre; remaining engaging throughout and even managing to be somewhat moving, on occasion...
Train to Busan:
Ultimately, ‘Train to Busan’ is an absolute white knuckle rollercoaster ride with the undead. Miss it at your peril...
Treeless Mountain:
A quietly gripping, sometimes painfully heart-breaking, and ultimately life affirming drama, Treeless Mountain provides an unmissable view of the world of the main characters, from three feet off the ground...
The Trip:
An utterly beautiful film, in both its story and setting, The Trip fully deserves every accolade beginning with "heart" that you could possibly think of...
The Truth Beneath:
Initially appearing to be a tale of politics and family, ‘The Truth Beneath’ ultimately shows itself to be a far more personal and poignant story of one woman’s efforts to uncover the truth of what happened to her daughter, and her discovery in the process of the lies and betrayal that permeate her entire life...
Untold Scandal:
Untold Scandal is easily the most sensual and sumptuous of all of the adaptations of Les Liaisons Dangereuses. A tour-de-force from beginning to end, Untold Scandal is a film which everyone should be told about...




The Uprising:
A seemingly endless pre-occupation with forced exposition combined with a lack of character depth and, resultantly, next to no possible character empathy whatsoever, all adds up to The Uprising being interminably dull from start to finish. Not only a waste of the talents of Shim Eun-ha and Lee Jung-jae but, ultimately, also rather a waste of viewers' time...




Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned:
With ‘Vanishing Time’, director Uhm Tae-hwa deftly combines beautiful visuals, an engaging story and subtle yet memorable special effects to create a fantastical tale that ultimately contrasts childhood and adulthood...
Vegetarian:
A dark, and at times even bleak, story of mental illness, eating disorders, love, sex and betrayal, Vegetarian will give those who appreciate brooding drama something to really chew over...
The Villainess:
While the action set pieces of The Villainess are frankly incredible, a lack of character depth largely prevents the film from saying much thematically. The character of Sook-hee is certainly on a vengeance trip but she's a person seeking revenge who just happens to female, rather than speaking specifically of female revenge in Korean cinema...
The Wailing:
The Wailing takes director Na Hong-jin’s almost trademark intricate, pulse-pounding narrative intensity and ramps it up yet further with palpable character fear, paranoia and desperation. Thriller by name, utterly thrilling in nature, this darkly violent, three-pronged horror ‘whodunit’ is a worthy successor to The Chaser and The Yellow Sea...


Welcome To Dongmakgol:
An uplifting and gently funny tale, told with genuine affection and served up with copious amounts of popcorn (watch the film and you'll understand what I mean), Welcome To Dongmakgol reminds us that, whatever our beliefs and whatever the causes for which we fight, we should never forget our humanity...
A Werewolf Boy:
With the early buzz surrounding A Werewolf Boy and its subsequent success at the box office, the question of whether the film lives up to the hype instantly comes to the fore. However, while the narrative could almost be described as a ‘classic’ tale, sadly the familiarity of the story to almost any fan of Korean cinema results in a film that feels rather less than original in concept...
Wet Dreams:
Close to laugh-out-loud funny in places, Wet Dreams is a nostalgic trip through the memories of adolescence...



White Night:
White Night is an utterly superlative film which repeatedly reminds fans of Korean films of the reasons they fell in love with South Korean cinema in the first place. Film of the year!
The Wicked:
With the Korean horror genre having been somewhat in the doldrums of late - the majority of output (sadly) being rather predictable and/or generic - 'The Wicked' comes as an utter breath of fresh air; refreshingly original at the same time as succeeding in being one of the most deeply creepy and wickedly humorous Korean horrors for quite some time...
Will You Be There?:
Based on Guillaume Musso’s French novel Seras-tu là?, director Hong Ji-young’s gently engaging ‘Will You Be There?’ fits so well with a number of utterly classic Korean cinema tropes, genres and sub-genres that it wholly succeeds on both a specifically Korean and generally international level...
Windstruck:
A rather lackluster script and jolting switches between genres diminish what would otherwise be an engaging story, and the constant mirroring of elements from My Sassy Girl are a constant reminder of all the things that Windstruck would have liked to have been...
Woochi: The Demon Slayer:
Numerous film genres blending seemlessly with top notch action, well-realised special effects and genuinely likeable characters add up to Woochi: The Demon Slayer being out and out spectacular entertainment from beginning to end...
The World of Silence:
Though flawed by the use of unlikely coincidences to move major plot points forward, worthy underlying theme discussion combined with engaging characterisation and some superb acting make The World of Silence a welcome addition to the serial killer/thriller genre...

The World of Us:
A gently moving story of the tumultuous relationship of two young girls, Yoon Ga-eun’s debut feature – ‘The World of Us’ – is exemplary in every respect. Highlighting both Yoon Ga-eun’s talent as a writer and director, and introducing the superlative natural acting skill of young newcomer Choi Soo-in, ’The World of Us’ ultimately shows that the world of a child is as large and complex as any...

 

Yellow Hair:
While Yellow Hair could never be described as subtle, and though its narrative depth is less involved than it could perhaps have been, this dark and twisted tale is nonetheless far more worthy of merit and discussion than the description "adult thriller" would suggest...
The Yellow Sea:
The Yellow Sea is a fast-paced, violent and bloody rollercoaster ride which details its numerous narrative threads in such a heart-pounding manner that it virtually guarantees audiences will be left exhilarated and perhaps even breathless...
Yeosu:
The stunningly beautiful surroundings of Yeosu provide the backdrop to the cathartic journey of a young man and woman who are both searching to understand and come to terms with their lives and choices. Visually stunning; narratively deep, Yeosu infuses its gently gripping story with intelligent, thought-provoking social commentary and critique throughout...
Yongsoon:
With Yongsoon, director Shin Joon presents a story of a young woman with such realism that viewers who have dealt with sometimes sullen, often surly adolescents in their own lives will almost feel they’ve actually met the titular character before...
Young Gun in the Time:
'Young Gun in the Time’ uses classic Korean cinema genre merging to be at once science fiction, mystery thriller, romance and comedy. Though it is low budget through-and-through, that is in fact one of the many charms of this warm, engaging and gently funny film...
71 - Into The Fire:
Based on a true story, '71 - Into The Fire' tells its tale with gusto throughout, using breathtaking visuals within epic battle scenes to show the chaos and carnage of war and the ultimate price it demands, albeit in a slightly predictable manner in places...